3 Things That Happen to the Brain on Coffee

Coffee may be America’s favorite productivity booster. But drenching our brains in coffee daily can actually make our performance worse. Luckily an effective, safe alternative is now available.

No doubt about it...

A jolt of caffeine is great for greasing the brain’s gears.

And a steaming cup of Joe in the morning can ignite our productivity... lift our mood... and laser focus our minds.

But constantly dousing the brain in caffeine also has its downside.

Three downsides, in fact.

Which can make an afternoon slump the least of our problems.

1. A Tidal Wave of Repressed Exhaustion

Ever wondered why caffeine perks us up so fast?

It’s because caffeine turns OFF the ‘tiredness’ neurotransmitter in the brain.1

A neurotransmitter called ‘adenosine’.2

Adenosine’s job is to tell our brains when to feel tired. So we slow down and stop working when it’s time to recharge.

But when caffeine turns adenosine OFF, the reverse happens.

We instantly feel alert… productive… and able to keep working for longer.3

But the problem is that it can take up to 12 hours for adenosine to get switched ‘on’ again.

Which is why drinking coffee in the afternoon can ruin our sleep…

And make us even more tired the next day.

This then can cause us to drink even more coffee to keep going…

And lead to a build up of exhaustion, just waiting to hit us like a tsunami at the worst moment.

2. Our Brains Start SCREAMING for Coffee

Like any stimulant, the more coffee we drink the more our brains get used to it.

And then the more our brains get used to it…

The MORE coffee we have to drink to get the same buzz.

So that if we suddenly cut back or stop drinking coffee altogether…

Our brains go into withdrawal.

We can then feel exhausted… rundown… lousy...

And even get stabbing headaches as our brains SCREAM at us for a caffeine fix.4

Until we finally give in… down a few cups… and put our inevitable caffeine withdrawal on hold for another day.

3. Feeling Nervy in ‘Fight or Flight’ Mode

Along with switching off the tiredness neurotransmitter...

Another reason coffee helps us feel alert is because it triggers the release of the ‘fight or flight’ hormone cortisol.5

Back in tribal times, cortisol was key to our survival.

It was cortisol that primed our bodies to escape from danger or to face a threat head on.

But while today we may not have sabre toothed tigers or invading hordes to worry about...

Our body’s STILL release cortisol in response to perceived threats.

A job interview, an argument with a loved one, or when someone attacks us on social media can all cause a drip drip release of cortisol.

But drinking coffee all day can turn these drips into a flood.

Causing us to feel on edge... jittery... irritable...

And far from the productivity powerhouse we wanted to be.

The Brain’s #1 Driver for Pursuing Success in Life

Rather than triggering cortisol to keep us going…


What this new productivity solution does is promote peak levels of the brain’s‘ reward hormone’.

A hormone called ‘dopamine’.6

Dopamine motivates us to pursue challenging activities… to chase after our goals… and to grab life by the horns.

And having healthy dopamine may have more influence over our success in life than any other brain chemical.

But on the flipside, a lack of dopamine can result in low energy…

A lack of motivation…

A dull libido…

And even giving up on chasing our goals in life.

No doubt about it…

Struggling with low dopamine is no fun at all.

The good news is that it’s possible to quickly and easily support dopamine at optimal levels...

So we can enjoy peak motivation… all day productivity… and feel eager to take on the day firing on all cylinders.

And the best part is that this method takes as little as 10 seconds to do each morning:

PRIVACY POLICY | RETURNS & SHIPPING | TRANSPARENCY | SUPPORT

© Copyright 2020 Natural Stacks

References:

[1] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20164566/

[2] https://science.howstuffworks.com/caffeine4.htm

[3] https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/coffee-brain

[4] https://www.healthline.com/health/caffeine-effects-on-body

[5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2257922/

[6] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/9858756/