Yogurt and Fruit Juice Combo? Study Says Yes

In recent years there has been a growing interest in nutrition, and as a result of this, consumers are becoming more and more educated about what’s healthy and what’s not.

Consequently, the development of functional foods and products fortified with beneficial nutrients such as vitamins or probiotics has been steadily on the rise.

At the top of the list, among the most sought-for products are fermented dairy products, like kefir and yogurt, especially.

Their popularity is due to them being rich in probiotics and generally easier to digest than non-fermented dairy products, like milk.

In fact, lactose intolerance is becoming a lot more common, and many people either opt for plant-based milks, or they uptake their yogurt consumption.

Therefore, there are many types of yogurt - from low-fat to lactose-free, and even fruit yogurt.

A new study on yogurt has examined the possibility of mixing yogurt with natural fruit juice to obtain a product that’s high in both probiotics and antioxidants.

What’s Important

Yogurt has more than 100 years of history and it’s the leader among dairy products when it comes to the health benefits.

Yogurt is incredibly abundant in calcium - just one cup provides 49% of the daily recommended intake.

Additionally, it contains large quantities of vitamins B12 and riboflavin (B2), as well as other minerals, like phosphorous, magnesium, and potassium.

Yogurt has been recognized as a very suitable vehicle for delivering probiotics to humans.

Fruit, on the other hand, is equally beneficial for your health.

Berries and grapes, in particular, are considered to have some of the highest antioxidant content and they’ve been linked to the prevention of many chronic diseases.

Therefore, the combination of a product like yogurt and berries and grapes juices seems like a match made in heaven.

The Details

This study aimed to create a product akin to fruit yogurt by incorporating natural fruit juices into yogurt and assess the characteristics of the final product, including its antioxidant activity.

The fruits used for the juices were blackberries, Aronia (black chokeberry), and grapes.

They created three types of yogurt using the juices from these three kinds of fruit and compared the results with plain yogurt (control yogurt) with no additives.

Here’s what was found:

  • The sugar content was within the normal range for this type of yogurt products, meaning it met the 5% maximum sugar content required for it to be considered as a low-sugar product;
  • The different juices all contributed to the final products having different amounts of antioxidant content. Blueberry yogurt had the biggest increase in antioxidant content of up to 49%, followed by grape and Aronia, with an increase of 30% to 33%. The control yogurt had the lowest antioxidant content.
  • In Conclusion

    The results of this study indicate that using fruit juice for the fortification of yogurt could be promising for the development of new functional products.

    Nevertheless, more studies are needed, such as human trials, in order to assess the potential health benefits.


    Resource: Dimitrellou, D.; Solomakou, N.; Kokkinomagoulos, E.; Kandylis, P. Yogurts Supplemented with Juices from Grapes and Berries. Foods 2020, 9, 1158. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091158 

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